Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act passed by the Senate

On September 11, the U.S. Senate passed the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 on a voice vote.
Nancy Zirkin, the executive vice president of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, was quoted in an article on www.civilrights.org as saying “Today’s Senate passage of the ADA Amendments Act gives the nation a glimpse of the legislative process at its highest and best. No narrow partisan politics barred the way to reinstating a vulnerable class of people with disabilities who had been excluded by narrow court decisions from the law’s protections – such as those with diabetes, cancer and bipolar disorder.”
The amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will overturn Supreme Court decisions that have reduced protections for people with certain disabilities including people with diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, mental disabilities, and cancer.
There seems to be general agreement that the ADA Amendments Act is an attempt to correct Supreme Court decisions limiting protections for individuals who were originally intended to be covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act .  The broad-based bipartisan support for this bill is encouraging. Hopefully this will lead to a greater willingness on the part of employers to accommodate people with these disabilities.  Undoubtedly this will lead to greater protections for individuals with disabilities such as diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, mental disabilities, and cancer.
The House passed its version of the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act by a vote of 402-17 on June 25, 2008.